Thursday, February 28, 2013

Hexagons, row by row

arranging on the design wall -- in progress
The simplicity and fun of making this hexagon quilt comes from easy steps, easy movement from one stage to the next.
--Select 2-1/2" strips and pair them.  (I'm using 1930s repro fabrics)
--Sew strip sets of the pairs.
--Use 60-degree ruler and cut 12 triangles from each stripset.  (I used Fons & Porter's 60-degree Pyramids ruler, but there are many versions available.)
--Sew identical triangles together in sets of 3.
--Arrange blocks on the design wall.
--Sew the blocks together, row by row.

The top and bottom rows are filled in with half-hexagons, so the top and bottom edges of the quilt will be straight.  But not the sides.  
Sewing together first two rows

In honor of my year of "Trying New Things," I'll leave the left and right edges in the shape of the hexagons, and I'll bind it as it is.
Shudder!!  Shudder!!  A shaped border on both sides!
Actually, I'm looking forward to it.  The shaped sides will add a whole new dimension to this otherwise rather simple quilt.
The pattern calls for making a bias binding, but as the sides are straight lines and corners, not curves, I don't think that's necessary.   Input, please?   Is a bias binding required?    If I was using a stripe or plaid for the binding, I might cut it on the bias, just for that fun look, but I'll be using a print. 

14 comments:

Janet O. said...

Even though they aren't curved edges, just angles, I wonder if the bias binding wouldn't take the angles more smoothly. Having done next to nothing in the way of angled binding (just a little table runner), my experience is very limited. I know I have read that when having to take all of the curves and angles of such bindings, using a single fold binding reduces the bulk in the corners.
It is a wonderful quilt.Very happy and spring-like!
Just curious--iIs there a lot of seam bulk where the points come together?

Marei said...

I don't think it's necessary for bias. I've found the tricky part to be the "inside" of the hex. Getting that fold just right took me some practice. I'm with Janet on using single fold for this binding.....it's just easier to get it to look like you want. And I think you might want to go 'narrower'. I'm loving this and since I love using my 60 degree ruler I just might have to do one of these. Really, Vivian! You're always giving me more ideas!!

Raewyn said...

I wouldn't have thought that a bias binding was necessary but I haven't done a quilt with edges like this. Some designers seem to use bias even on a straight edge. I will be interested to hear how your binding finishes up. I love how your hexagons are looking - it sounds like quite a fun pattern to try.

Maureen said...

How fun! Are those 30's repros? Thanks for explaining how you did it. I'm not sure about the binding. I have done a scalloped edge and it was easy with biased binding. You could do a little practice piece but I wouldn't think the bias was necessary.

Exuberant Color said...

No you don't need bias binding. I bound the edge of one with 2" points all the way around a 96" square quilt. I used a single fold however rather than double fold binding so it would be less bulky in all of those corners and points.

Julia said...

It going to be a lovely quilt Vivian...you know I love '30's fabrics.
I don't think it needs to be on the bias either, but that's a good idea to use a single fold, to reduce bulk..
Have fun!
Julia ♥

Amy said...

Check out Heather Mulder Peterson's blog, Trends and Traditions. If you put "binding" in her search engine, you'll get several blog entries on binding odd edges. Her tutorials on these bindings are amazing! I wish I had her photos when I did a scalloped edge quilt 7 years ago.

AnnieO said...

The hexies look great! I'll echo the above comment about Heather's tutorials. She is a bias binding afficionado; however I have used straight grain binding almost exclusively unless it is a stripe, as you say. I don't think it is necessary, myself.

Cathy said...

I love your quilt. I am working on a hexagon table runner. It is going to be one of UFO's I want to finish for March. Hugs

Pokey said...

I like the hexies very sweet in your prints! I use only straight cut binding, too, and feel like we are in good company with the friends who have chimed in above. Go with what you are comfortable ~
:-}pokey

Barb said...

What a clever technique! It looks really great and I'd never have known with you showing it.
good luck with the binding, can't wait to see it.

Merilyn said...

That hexie technique looks to be interesting, I love the result, great fabrics too!!! I can't really answer you questing about the binding, hopefully someone out there will be able to assist you!!! I do love the idea of the uneven sides, this will add a lot of visual interest to the quilt!!!

Lori said...

Love it! If you have to turn a sharp corner I'd do bias. It really isn't that much harder to make than straight.

Sandy said...

Is this quilt a keeper for You?
Really like it and may have to accept your challenge with the thirty fabrics I have around my sewing room.
Keep us posted on your progress.
Stay warm.

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